Muaythai Website

Posted in Muaythai with tags , , , on March 12, 2009 by OaTtO

muaythaico

“Muaythai  Thai heritage  World heritage” The interesting sport from thailand.If you are MuaythaiFan you can’t miss this website place you can read all about Muaythai,rule of Muaythai,Muaythai Schedule,Muaythai results etc. That you interesting.

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Tags: muaythai , muaythai equipment , boxing school , thai boxing

Muaythai Equipment

Posted in Muaythai, Muaythai Equipment with tags , , on March 9, 2009 by OaTtO

Fairtex Blue Satin with Silver Mesh and Laces Muay Thai Shorts - Size M

 

Everlast Pro Style 8-Ounce Youth Training Gloves (Red)

Everlast Pro Style 8-Ounce Youth Training Gloves (Red)

 

TITLE Lo-Top Boxing Shoes

TITLE Lo-Top Boxing Shoes

Muay Thai techniques

Posted in Muaythai, Muaythai Techniques with tags , , on March 8, 2009 by OaTtO

In its original form, Muay Thai consisted of an arsenal of nine weapons – the head, fists, elbows, knees and feet – known collectively as na-wa arwud. However in modern Muay Thai, both amateur and professional, headbutting an opponent is no longer allowed.

To strike and bind the opponent for both offensive and defensive purposes, small amounts of stand-up grappling are used: the clinch. Formal Muay Thai techniques are divided into two groups: Mae Mai or major techniques and Luk Mai or minor techniques. MuayThai is often a fighting art of attrition, where opponents exchange blows with one another. This is certainly the case with traditional stylists in Thailand, but is a less popular form of fighting in the contemporary world fighting circuit. With the success of Muay Thai in mixed martial arts fighting, it has become the de facto martial art of choice for competitive stand-up fighters. As a result, it has evolved and incorporated much more powerful hand striking techniques used in western style boxing and the Thai style of exchanging blow for blow is no longer favorable. Note: when Muay Thai fighters compete against fighters of other styles (and if the rules permit it), they almost invariably emphasize elbow (sok) and knee (kao) techniques to gain a distinct advantage in fighting. Almost all techniques in MuayThai use the entire body movement, rotating the hip with each kick, punch, and block. The rotation of the hips in Muay Thai techniques, and intensive focus on “core muscles” (such as abdominal muscles and surrounding muscles) is very distinctive and is what sets Muay Thai apart from other styles of martial arts.

Muaythai History

Posted in Muaythai, Muaythai History with tags , , on March 8, 2009 by OaTtO

Various forms of kickboxing have long been practiced throughout Southeast Asia. As with the most countries in the region, Thai culture is highly influenced by ancient civilizations within Southeast Asia. Muay Thai’s origin in Thailand can be traced back to its ancestor Muay Boran (“ancient boxing”), an unarmed combat used by Siamese soldiers in conjunction with Krabi Krabong, the weapon-based style. Eventually Muay Boran was divided to:

Muay Korat (Northeast) emphasized strength. A technique like “Throwing Buffalo Punch” was used. It could supposedly defeat a buffalo in one blow.
Muay Lopburi (Center region) emphasized movements. Its strong points were straight and counter punches.
Muay Chaiya (South) emphasized posture and defense, as well as elbows and knees.
– Muay Pra Nakorn (North) emphasized speed, particularly in kicking. Because of its faster speed, it was called as well “Ling Lom” (windy monkey or Loris).

There is a phrase about Muay Boran that states, “Punch Korat, Wit Lopburi, Posture Chaiya, Faster Thasao. (หมัดหนักโคราช ฉลาดลพบุรี ท่าดีไชยา ไวกว่าท่าเสา)”.

As well as continuing to function as a practical fighting technique for use in actual warfare, MuayThai became a sport in which the opponents fought in front of spectators who went to watch for entertainment. This kind of muay contests gradually became an integral part of local festivals and celebrations, especially those held at temples. It was even used as entertainment to kings.

Eventually, the previously bare-fisted fighters started wearing lengths of rope wrapped around their hands and forearms. This type of match was called muay kaad chuek (มวยคาดเชือก).

wikipedia

About Muaythai

Posted in Muaythai, Muaythai History with tags , on March 8, 2009 by OaTtO

MuayThai  is a form of hard martial art practiced in large parts of the world, including Thailand and other Southeast Asian countries. The art is similar to others in Southeast Asia such as: pradal serey in Cambodia, lethwei in Myanmar, tomoi in Malaysia, and Lao boxing in Laos. MuayThai has a long history in Thailand and is the country’s national sport. Traditional Muay Thai practiced today varies significantly from the ancient art muay boran and uses kicks and punches in a ring with gloves similar to those used in Western boxing.

MuayThai is referred to as “The Art of the Eight Limbs”, as the hands, shins, elbows, and knees are all used extensively in this art. A practitioner of Muay Thai (“nak muay”) thus has the ability to execute strikes using eight “points of contact,” as opposed to “two points” (fists) in Western boxing and “four points” (fists, feet) used in the primarily sport-oriented forms of martial arts.